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Control the Heat with PowerPoint Mouse Overs

By Glenna Shaw

 

Most of us are familiar with mouse overs on web pages.  You move your mouse over an object and something changes on the screen.  However, most people don’t realize how easy it is to create this same effect in PowerPoint 2000 or higher.  This article shows you how to take PowerPoint mouse overs to the extreme.  You’ll create a slideshow that has a thermometer for the menu.  You can move through the slideshow by sliding your mouse up and down the thermometer, raising and lowering the “heat”.

 

Begin by creating your main background page.  Open PowerPoint and click ok for a new slideshow.  On the toolbar, click View, Master, and Slide Master.  Set up the color scheme by clicking on Format, Slide Color Scheme, click on the color scheme with the blue background, click on Apply To All.  Change the fonts by clicking on Edit, Select All, to select all the text.  Click on Format, Font and change the font to Arial, Regular.  Click ok.  While you still have all the text selected, use your mouse to decrease the text space on the left side.  Move your mouse over the left side marker (one of the white squares) of the text box until it turns into a line with arrows on the left and right (not the cross with four arrows).  Click and hold your left mouse button and move the left side of your text to create room for the thermometer menu.  Click anywhere off the slide to deselect the text.  You now have a slide with a blue background and Arial text.  You also have room on the left side for your thermometer.

 

 

 

If you don’t have Autoshapes on the bottom toolbar, click on View, Toolbars, and Drawing.  To create the thermometer, click on Autoshapes, Basic Shapes, and select Rounded Rectangle.  Draw your Rounded Rectangle on the left side of the slide to create the body of the thermometer.  Change the fill color of the rectangle to white.  Click on Autoshapes, Basic Shapes, Oval.  Draw your oval over the bottom of the rectangle to create the bulb of the thermometer.  Change the fill color of the oval to red.  Click on Autoshapes, Basic Shapes, Rectangle.  Draw a rectangle to cover the space where the bulb meets the thermometer body.  Change the rectangle fill color to red.  Create lines on the thermometer by clicking on Autoshapes, Lines, and Line.  Draw a line just above the top of the red rectangle.  Change the line color to black.  Click on Edit, Copy, Edit, and Paste to create another line and move it above the first line.  Create one line for each slide of your presentation (we’ll use five for our example).  To evenly space the lines, hold down the shift key and click on each line.  Make sure you only select the lines.  Click on Draw, Align or Distribute, and Distribute Vertically.  Your lines should now be evenly spaced on the body of your thermometer.

 

 

Your final step on the Master Slide is to create your first mouse-over.  Right click on the oval shape, click on Action Settings, Click the Mouse Over tab, Click on Hyperlink, Change Next Slide to Slide…, Slide 1, Click ok.  Click ok again.  Click Close on the small Master Window.

 

You’re now at your title slide.  Click on Insert, New Slide.  Repeat for the number of slides needed.  We use five slides in the example, so we’ll have six slides.  Go to Slide 2.  Click on Autoshapes, Basic Shapes, Rectangle.  Draw a rectangle to increase the temperature on the thermometer to the first line.  Change the rectangle fill color to red.  Repeat for each slide, increasing to the next line on the thermometer for each successive slide.

 

 

The final step (and trickiest) is creating your “invisible” mouse-over buttons.

Return to the first slide.  Click on Draw, Basic Shapes, Rectangle.  Draw a rectangle over the thermometer that goes from the top of the bulb to the top line of the thermometer.  Do not change the rectangle fill color yet.  Right click on this rectangle, click on Action Settings, Click the Mouse Over tab, Click on Hyperlink, Change Next Slide to Slide…, Slide 6 (or your last slide), Click ok.  Click ok again.  Create another rectangle that goes from the bottom of this rectangle to the next line down on the thermometer.  Right click on this rectangle, click on Action Settings, Click the Mouse Over tab, Click on Hyperlink, Change Next Slide to Slide…, Slide 5 (or your next to last slide), Click ok.  Click ok again.  Repeat this step for each remaining slide, moving DOWN the thermometer and BACKWARDS through the slides as you go.  It is important to go from top to bottom so the mouse-over buttons are in the proper order.

 

Select all the mouse-over buttons by holding down the shift key and clicking on each one from the bottom up.  Click on Draw, Align or Distribute, and Align Bottom.  Click on Draw, Group to make the next step easier.  Click on Draw, Order, Bring to Front.  Click on Edit, Copy.  Click on Format, Autoshape, and change the fill color and line color to No Fill and No Line.  Your mouse-over buttons will now be invisible.  Click on Draw, Ungroup to separate the buttons again.  Go to Slide 2.  Click on Edit, Paste.  If necessary, move the grouped object to the correct position.  Click on Format, Autoshape, and change the fill color and line color to No Fill and No Line.  Click on Draw, Ungroup.  Go to Slide 3.  Click on Edit, Paste.  If necessary, move the grouped object to the correct position.  Click on Format, Autoshape, and change the fill color and line color to No Fill and No Line.  Click on Draw, Ungroup.  Repeat for the remaining slides.

 

 

 

Save your presentation.  Enter the desired titles and text on your slides.  Save the presentation again.

 

When you run your slideshow, move your mouse up and down the thermometer.  Your slideshow will automatically move back and forth among your slides to match the thermometer temperature.


 

Was this tutorial helpful?  Please feel free to share your comments &/or suggestions.

 


Copyright 2003.  Glenna Raye Shaw.  All Rights Reserved.